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Craven County Child Support Enforcement
Craven County Child Support Enforcement
Craven County Child Support Enforcement
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Craven County Child Support Enforcement

Establishing a Support Order

What is Order Establishment?

After paternity is established, a petition will be filed with the court requesting that child support be established. The non-custodial parent will be served with the appropriate petition prior to the court date. The amount of the child support order will be set according to North Carolina's Child Support Guidelines, unless the judge finds that it would not be appropriate to do so in your case.

What are Child Support Guidelines?

Guidelines use a formula to help determine the amount of child support to be paid by the non-custodial parent. The North Carolina Child Support Guidelines are based on the Income Shares model, which was developed under the Child Support Guidelines Project funded by the U.S. Office of Child Support Enforcement and administered by the National Center for State Courts. The Income Shares model is based on the concept that child support is a shared parental obligation and that a child should receive the same proportion of parental income he or she would have received if the parents lived together. These guidelines are intended to provide adequate child support that is equitable to all parties. The guidelines do not apply to stepparents.

The guidelines allow for a number of circumstances under which deviation from the normal guideline is permitted. One or more of these reasons could result in a different support amount than that usually recommended. Reasons include:

  • Number of nights spent with each parent
  • Extraordinary medical costs

For more information, go to https://nddhacts01.dhhs.state.nc.us/home.jsp?TargetScreen=WorkSheet.jsp

What about medical coverage?

If the judge orders it, the non-custodial parent may be required to cover the child(ren) under his or her group health insurance plan. Our office will petition the court to order health insurance coverage if it is currently available to the non-custodial parent or when it becomes available to the non-custodial parent.

Click here to send new information about the non-custodial parent’s medical coverage to your caseworker.

How do I pay my child support order?

Federal law requires that money from your paycheck be deducted to pay your child support--just like taxes. Child support is collected and disbursed by a central collection unit. Money will be prorated based on pay cycle and withheld from your wages unless you are self-employed.

If the non-custodial parent is self-employed or unemployed, they are responsible for submitting their child support payment directly to the North Carolina Centralized Collections Operations at PO Box 900006, Raleigh N.C. 27675-9006. Payment can be made by check, money order, or automatic bank draft. To request an authorization form to initiate automatic bank draft, or to ask any other question, call 1-800-992-9457 between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

It is the non-custodial parent's responsibility to pay the full amount of the child support order on time, every time. If the non-custodial parent fails to make a full payment, a record of the missed payment will be kept. The obligation to pay child support does not go away when you do not make a payment. By law, child support obligations take priority over mortgage payments, car loans, credit card debt, and other debt.

Information Required

To determine the amount of the child support order, the judge will need to know the name and address of the current or most recent employer of the non-custodial parent and his or her gross/net income.

Child support will be ordered even if one parent does not attend the hearing. If the non-custodial parent does not attend the court hearing or provide wage information, a default order can be entered. The best way to ensure a fair child support order is for the non-custodial parent to be present at the court hearing. If the non-custodial parent is unemployed, the order will be set based on the non-custodial parent's ability to earn.

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